Friday, October 9, 2015

Inland Fisheries Research at KIFI: September 2015 monthly progress report.


KIFI Research: September 2015
by
Francois Jacobs

The following documents and research proposals was submitted during September 2015:
  • 1.  Evaluating the tag retention potential and effects of plastic tipped dart tags, PIT tags, internal and external radio transmitter on the health of Oreochromis andersonii a social economic important freshwater fish species   (9 September)
  • 2.  Standard operating procedure for inland fisheries research Draft 1:10 September
  • 3.   Collecting morphometric and meristic data for Serranochromis altus and Serranochromis angusticeps : 14 September
  • 4.   Inland Fisheries Research schedule for the remainder of 2015 and for 2016: 21 September
  • 5.   The life history strategies of two social economic important freshwater fish species Serranochromis angusticeps and Serranochromis altus in the Okavango River : 23 September
  • 6.   Standard operating procedure for inland fisheries research :Draft 2 , 25 September



Tagging of fish species in the display aquarium was initiated on the 30th of September and forms part of the study titled: Evaluating the tag retention potential and effects of plastic tipped dart tags, PIT tags, internal and external radio transmitter on the health of Oreochromis andersonii a social economic important freshwater fish species. In brief:

Fishes were conditioned in aquarium facilities and general environmental conditions were kept constant. Individual fishes were collected using a hand held scoop net. Suitable fishes were submerged in an aerated tagging container, after which 10ml clove oil (0.5 ml.l−1) was added until signs of narcosis became evident. Tagging equipment was cleaned in ethanol before use and hands were sterilised with Betadine (Adcock Ingram Ltd, Bryanston, South Africa). Thereafter PIT tags (10.3 mm x 2.1mm in diameter) with a coil and integrated circuit, were inserted into the peritoneal cavity or musculature of fishes using a syringe injector (Figure 1). Thereafter fish were allowed to recover and released back into aquarium. These fish will be monitored intensively for the next couple of months to assess the affect that PIT tags have on these species. Preliminary results of this experiment will be included with the next progress report.

Figure 1: Tagging station was set up in advance (A), with injectors preloaded with PIT tags (A1-A2), thereafter individual fishes were collected using a hand held scoop net (B) and transported to an aerated tagging container (C), after which 10ml clove oil (0.5 ml.l−1) was added until signs of narcosis became evident (D). Tagging equipment was cleaned in ethanol before use and hands were sterilised with Betadine, thereafter PIT tags (10.3 mm x 2.1mm in diameter) with a coil and integrated circuit, were inserted into the peritoneal cavity or musculature of fishes using a syringe injector (E) and unique code was read and recorded (F).
Aquarium and staff initiative
The tanks in the aquarium is in the process of being upgraded for display purposes. This facility will host a staff test which is an initiative to get people involved and interested in various fish species (
Figure 2). Brood stock collection has started and data collection is continuously being documented during these surveys as part of a long term monitoring program. 

Figure 2: Aquarium facilities being prepared for a staff test on various fish species as part of training and educating staff. This includes putting substrate into crocodile pond (A-B) and glass aquaria (C-E) as well as treating fish for possible diseases (F-G). Aquarium fish species is collected in addition to brood-stock collection (I-J).

Workshops attended
1.      A stakeholder meeting at Shamvura was held on the 8th of September. A full report (FISHERIES KAVANGO REGION FOCUS GROUP MEETING) on this meeting was submitted and is available on request.  

2.      In addition KIFI hosted an EUS training and planning workshop from 23-24 September 2015. This workshop will result in a EUS surveillance programme that will be carried out during biological surveys and other rearch activities on inland water bodies. It will include an Emmergency Preparedness Plan  to deal with sudden outbreaks of fish diseases. 

EUS training and planning workshop at KIFI






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