Monday, September 30, 2013

Five Year Fisheries Sectoral and Annual Execution Plans: Stakeholder Consultation Workshop: NIPAM, 23 September 2013

Honourable Minister, B. Esau and Honourable Deputy Minister, Ankama during the official opening of the workshop


A Fisheries stakeholder consultation workshop on the develoment of a five year  Sectoral and Annual Execution Plan was held at  NIPAM on the 23rd of September 2013. The workshop was attended by Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources staff and stakeholders from the fishing industry.

The objectives of the workshop were:
  • To consult stakeholders on the development of a Five Year Sectoral and Annual Execution Plan
  • To develop the Five Year Fisheries Sectoral Plan  for 2012 -2017 and the Annual Execution plan for 2013/14
  • Develop a sense of commitment and ownership of the plan
  • Provide a base from which progress can be measure


Implementation Of Sex Reversal Technique & Selective Breeding Projects, Prof Rana: 14-29 September 2013

Prof. Rana, FAO Consultant busy training KIFI and Hardap IAC staff on the application of hormonal sex reversal techniques at KIFI
FAO consultant, Professor Rana, visited (16+17 September) the Hardap Inland Aquaculture Center (HIAC), Kamutjonga Inland Fisheries Institute (KIFI) and Onavivi Inland Aquaculture Center (Onavivi IAC) on his second FAO mission to provide technical guidance for the implementation of sex reversal technique and selective breeding projects from 14-29 September 2013. He visited KIFI from 19-22 September where he trained 10 KIFI staffmembers on sex reversal techniques.

The  training sessions at KFI had the overall purpose to:

  • brief staff on tools available for all male production
  • understanding the challenges for all male seed production by chosen method
  • apply these observations to MFMR facilities and practices
  • apply minds to sex reversal programme

The following topics was presented during the training session at KIFI

  1. All male seed production
  2. Understanding sex-reversal technology 
  3. Reproductive behaviour wrt seed production
  4. Considerations for broodstock management
  5. Ontogeny of early development
  6. Incubation systems
  7. Feedback on knowledge gained-group discussion and exercise
Prof. Rana also inspected the size and weight of the broodstock (three-spot tilapia) at KIFI collected in the Kavango river for the Selective Breeding Programme that will commence later this year. KIFI staff treated Prof. Rana to a delightful fish braai at the KIFI lapa, Saturday evening.

Prof. Rana visited Onavivi/Omahenene Inland Aquaculture Center from 24-25 September 2013 where he evaluated issues pertaining to the Selective Breeding Programme in terms of  procurement and broodstock. He also discussed best solutions for establishing an incubation system for the Selective Breeding Programme and tagging trails to identify fish. He also evaluated progress on tasks at hand for the selection programme and then developed a "way forward".

Prof. Rana returned to South Africa on Sunday, 29 September after a meeting with the FAO office in Windhoek on Friday, 27 September 2013

Thursday, September 26, 2013

CETMAR-AECID Spanish Delegation visit KIFI: 19 September 2013

Jose María Martínez Lago (L),Paloma Rueda Crespo,Yolanda Molares, Mercedes Martínez and Marta Quinzán at KIFI

A Spanish delegation of CETMAR visited KIFI on the 19th of September 2013 as part of their mission to Namibia from 15-26 September 2013 to discuss issues related to CETMAR's interventions towards the Strengthening of Aquaculture Development in Namibia as a tool aimed to improve the economic growth in the country. 

The delegation was led by  Paloma Rueda Crespo, Director of CETMAR and accompanied by  Yolanda Molares, Headquarters,  Mercedes Martínez, Headquarters, Jose María Martínez Lago, PE in Namibia – CIAC Project,   Marta Quinzán, PE in Namibia – NatMIRC

Issues pertaining to CETMAR's involvement amongst other in the construction of the Aquaculture complex for the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (Directorate: Aquaculture) in Katima Mulilo and the Practical Training Course in Aquaculture currently underway at KIFI were discussed.

Broodstock Collection for the Oreochromis andersonii (3 Spot Tilapia) Selective Breeding Program

KIFI staff pulling the dragnet for broodstock in the Kavango river near KIFI
The Directorate Aquaculture in collaboration with the South South Cooperation and with assistence of the FAO Project: GCP/NAM/014/SPA  is busy with broodstock collection in preparation for a selective breeding program to improve the genetic potential of Oreochromis andersonii (3-Spot tilapia) for aquaculture production. The process is in full swing with the collection of the base population broodstock from the Kunene-, Kavango- and Zambezi drainage systems. 250 Mixed sex male and female fish need to be collected from each system.

It is proving to be a very challenging exercise as the 3-Spot tilapia is not so easy to catch, especially if the desired size of the broodstock is 200-250g while you are dodgeing crocodiles and hippo. KIFI staff managed to collect about 100 three-spot with just over 100 being collected in the Zambezi region up to date. The process will continue deep into October untill the required number of  broodstock has been collected ...

KIFI staff and temporary workers fixing the net for the broodstock collection
Fish collected during one of the hauls...only 2 of them were 3-spot...the rest (rendali and greenheads)

Monday, September 16, 2013

Fish Identification: Dusky Bream...?


DUSKY BREAM...?

26 August 2013: Mauro Rosa from the Crockango Angling Club requested (sms) information on the "Dusky bream" as there is no description of it in prof. Skelton's book, "Fishes of Southern Africa"....?

Response from Denis Tweddle:


Sargochromis species in Upper Zambezi, Namibia

"There are four species of smallmouth breams, Sargochromis species, in the Upper Zambezi River. Two of these are believed to be definitively identified. These two are the pink bream, Sargochromis giardi, and the rainbow bream, Sargochromis carlottae.

The third species, a smaller, less deep bodied species was thought to be the green bream,Sargochromis codringtonii, while a fourth species was confused with the pink bream until very recently.

Because of its darker overall colouration, the name ‘dusky bream’ was suggested for this latter species. In referring back to the original descriptions instead of relying on the revision by Bell-Cross in 1975, it has now been realised that the dusky bream is in fact almost certainly S. codringtonii...."


Read more about this on our page: Fish Identification

Friday, September 13, 2013

Budget Preparation 2014/15 - 2016/17

The Permanent Secretary, Ms. Ulitala Hiveluah  and the MFMR managers finalising the budget for 2014/15 - 2016/17
Managers of the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources (MFMR) met on Monday, 9 September to finalise the budget of the ministry for the Meduim Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) for the period 2014/15-2016/17 of the development budget. The budget is aligned to the 4th National Development Plan (NDP4). 


Namibia-Congo (Brazzaville) Joint Permanent Commission of Cooperation: 3-5 September 2013

Windhoek Country Club Resort
A short report on the just concluded 3rd Session of the Namibia-Congo (Brazzaville) Joint Permanent Commission of Cooperation that was held from the 3rd to 5th September 2013, at Country Club and Resort, in Windhoek.
 
The Committee on Economic, Infrastructure and Tourism deliberating issues


The Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources was represented by the following officials:

·        Mr. Renier Burger, Deputy Director: Aquaculture and  Inland Fisheries
·        Mr. Cornelius Bundje, Director: NAMFI
·        Mr. Tobias Nambala, Deputy Director: NAMFI
·        Mr. Victor Pea, Chief Policy Analyst

Commission’s deliberation on fishery issues:

Issues pertaining to the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources were as follows:

·        Training of Congolese trainees at NAMFI
·        Implementation of the Memorandum of  Understanding in the field of fisheries and aquaculture, and
·        Draft Agreement in the field of Maritime Training

The first two points were allocated to the Committee on Economic, Infrastructure and Tourism, while the last point was allocated under the Committee on Legal and Diplomatic Matters.

The delegation gave a progress report on the training of Congolese students at NAMFI, and deferred the other two points to the envisaged bilateral meeting between the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture of Congo and the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources to be held later this year (October 2013). 

It was agreed that the Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources should invite the Autonomous Port of Point-Noire to the bilateral meeting planned for 16 to 18 October 2013 for the finalisation and signing of the Agreement.  

Way forward:

·        The Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources finalised the Agreement, and make a decision as to who will sign the Agreement on behalf of NAMFI.

·        The Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources extend an official invitation via diplomatic channels to the Port of Point-Noire so that one person may join the delegation from the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture.




Sunday, September 8, 2013

Kwando and Kavango river isotope field trip report, September 2013





Participating  researchers: Dr Olaf Weyl and Dr Sven Kaehler, PhD students: Richard Peel and Geraldine Taylor

Introduction

This field trip is part of a larger project on the Zambezi, Kavango and Kwando rivers in Namibia which aims to improve knowledge of the aquatic ecosystems supporting fisheries through studies on fish population dynamics, food webs, nutrients and biodiversity. The research will be undertaken primarily by two PhD students: Richard Peel and Geraldine Taylor through Rhodes University. The students introduced their studies to local staff and students in presentations given at the Kamutjonga Inland Fisheries Institute (KIFI) on the Kavango River on the 26th August 2013. 

Figure 1: Geraldine Taylor introducing an overview of her studies to staff and students at KIFI

The project is funded primarily by the Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management (SASSCAL) and co-funded by the South African National Research Foundation and Nedbank Namibia’s Go Green Fund. The project is administered by the Namibia Nature foundation and involves several collaborating institutions including the South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, Rhodes University, University of Namibia and the Namibian Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources.
The field trip was carried out from the 17th to the 27th August 2013.  The objective of the trip was to collect tissue samples from fish and their potential food sources for stable isotope analysis to describe the food webs of the Kwando and Kavango rivers. Understanding floodplain river food webs is important for ecosystem management, as it allows one to assess the importance of the seasonal flood pulse for biodiversity and productivity, and the potential impact of water abstraction and flow regulation that may disrupt the natural flow regime. It is also important for fisheries management as overfishing may alter fish assemblage structure and the structure and dynamics of the food web, with consequences for fish production and sustainability.

Sampling


Sampling was carried out on the Kwando River from the 17th to the 24th August and on the Kavango River from the 25th to the 27th August. Fish samples were collected using gillnets, fyke nets, D-nets, and by angling. Invertebrates were sampled using a SASS net and a drift net. Detritus and benthic invertebrates were sampled using a cone dredge, and aquatic plants were sampled by hand. The minimum number of each species was sacrificed in order to sample different size groups that may utilize different food sources.

Figure 2: Sampling invertebrates and setting fyke nets on the margins of the Kwando River.
Figure 3: The river crab Potamonautes bayonianus, an important prey item for many fishes.
A total of 403 samples were collected from the Kwando River and 238 samples from Kavango River. Fish species sampled are listed in table 1 below. All samples will be analysed at the isotope laboratory at Rhodes University.

Figure 4: The Zambezi parrotfish Cyphomyrus cubangoensis, a common mormyrid in the Kwando River.

Table 1: Fish species sampled in the Kwando and Kavango rivers.

Species
Kwando River
Kavango River
Aethiomastacembelus frenatus
X

Barbus afrovernayi
X
X
Barbus barnardi
X
X
Barbus eutenia

X
Barbus fasciolatus
X
X
Barbus paludinosus

X
Barbus multilineatus
X

Barbus radiates
X
X
Barbus thamalakanensis

X
Barbus unitaeniatus
X
X
Coptostomabarbus wittei
X

Brycinus lateralis
X
X
Chiloglanis fasciatus

X
Clarias gariepinus
X
X
Clarias ngamensis
X
X
Clarias theodorae
X

Cyphomyrus cubangoensis
X

Hemichromis elongates
X

Hemigrammocharax machadoi
X
X
Hemigrammocharax multifasciatus
X
X
Hepsetus cuveiri
X

Hydrocynus vittatus
X
X
Labeo lunatus

X
Marcusenius altisambesi
X
X
Micralestes acutidens
X
X
Micropanchax huterui

X
Micropanchax johnstoni
X
X
Micropanchax katangae
X
X
Mormyrus lacerda

X
Nannocharax macropterus

X
Opsaridium zambezensis
X

Oreochromis andersonii
X
X
Oreochromis macrochir
X

Parauchenoglanis ngamensis
X

Petrocephalus kavangoensis

X
Petrocephalus longicapitas
X

Pharyngochromis acuticeps
X
X
Pollimyrus castelnaui
X
X
Pseudocrenilabrus philander
X
X
Rhabdalestes maunensis
X

Sargochromis carlottae
X
X
Sargochromis codringtonii
X

Sargochromis “dusky”
X

Sargochromis giardi
X
X
Schilbe intermedius
X
X
Serranochromis altus
X
X
Serranochromis angusticeps
X
X
Serranochromis macrocephalus
X
X
Serranochromis robustus

X
Synodontis nigromaculatus
X
X
Synodontis sp.
X
X
Tilapia rendalli
X
X
Tilapia sparrmanii
X
X
Zeirichthys pallidus
X


The results from this survey will be used to describe the food webs of each of these rivers. These will then be compared to results obtained in previous surveys of Lake Liambezi and the Zambezi River to determine what drives the productivity in each of these systems and how they differ from one another. 

Figure 5:  Lab work in the Wet lab at KIFI. Working late into the night...